Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Woodchuck Caddis


Woodchuck Caddis

Hook: Dry fly
Thread: Black
Body: Dubbing in your choice of color to match the caddis in your area
Wing: Woodchuck hairs
Hackle: Brown & grizzly mixed

Monday, July 24, 2017

Top Hopper


Top Hopper

Hook:  Dry fly, sizez 8-12
Thread: Black
Tail: Orange hackle fibers
Body: Olive green chenille extended over the tail by looping the chenille
Wing: Woodchuck, ending at or just past the bend of the hook, tied trude style
Hackle: Brown

Reference: http://www.flyanglersonline.com/articles/oldflies/2011/oldflies20110912.php

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Tunkwanamid


Tunkwanamid


Hook: Straight or curved
Thread: Black
Tag/rib: Oval/round silver tinsel
Body: Peacock herl
Breathers: White ostrich herl

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Hot Mustard



Hot Mustard

Hook:  Dry fly style
Thread: Black
Tail: Gold antron yarn
Body: Gold antron yarn
Rib: Grizzly hackle, palmered


This easily tied fly was Josephine Sedlecky-Borsum rendition of the Little Yellow Stone. It was favored among the locals as a fly that could be fished from midsummer into late fall. It could also be fished during the Big Golden Stone hatch. This fly was developed in the early 1960's.

Little Jewel



Little Jewel (Dubbed)

Hook: Nymph/wet
Thread: Black
Ribbing: Oval/round/flat silver tinsel
Body: Dubbing in your choice of color
Hackle: Brown hen
Thorax: Black dubbing



Little Jewel (Original chenille)

Tying Light

Here is a cool idea for a tying light for your fly tying area/station.


Monday, July 17, 2017

Prince Nymph


Prince Nymph



Hook: Nymph/wet style
Bead: Tungsten or brass
Thread: Black 
Weight: Lead wire
Tail: Brown biot
Body: Peacock herl
Ribbing: Oval/round silver tinsel
Collar: Brown hackle
Horns: White biot

From the internet

"The Prince Nymph, known first as a Brown Forked-Tail Nymph, imitates nothing – and everything – simultaneously.  It has an inherent ‘bugginess’ that trout find it irresistible.  Its split biot tail is bold, the glossy green peacock herl shimmers in the current, the soft hackle collar breathes seductively, and the tinsel and white wings scream for attention.  It is your basic sub­sur­face attractor, one that has been catch­ing trout for decades.  Many devotees profess that it imitates stonefly nymphs.  Indeed, a Prince Nymph does resemble juvenile stoneflies.  But, it resembles juve­nile Christmas tree ornaments just about as well.  Perhaps trout take it as a stonefly, but a cased caddis larva, caddis pupa, mayfly or dobsonfly nymph, or even a drowned terrestrial seem equally plausi­ble. Does it matter?  Not a bit.  Prince Nymphs ap­peal to trout, and that’s what counts when you’re fill­ing the fly box or tying a clinch knot.
Doug Prince of Monterey, CA is often described as the originator of the Prince Nymph, but it was devel­oped and first tied in the 1930s by Don and Dick Olson, brothers from Bemidji, MN.  They called it the Brown Forked-Tail Nymph.  It acquired its princely name in a roundabout way during the 1940s.  Buz Buszek, namesake of the Federation of Fly Fishers’ annual award for fly tying excellence, owned a fly shop and mail-order business in Visalia, CA begin­ning in 1943.  He employed local tyers to supply flies for the shop.  Doug Prince was not a commercial fly tyer, but he was Buszek’s good friend and tied flies for him for one year in the 1940s.  Prince was a tal­ented fly tyer who knew California rivers well.  He tied his name­sake fly for California’s Kings River, but he called it the Brown Forked-Tail Nymph, presumably in refer­ence to the Olson original.  Buz Buszek was hur­riedly preparing a new mail-order catalog one day, and he wanted to in­clude Doug Prince’s peacock-bodied nymph that was so effective.  Buszek couldn’t remember the fly’s name, however, and in haste he just called it the “Prince Nymph”.  Buszek’s catalog was distributed throughout the West, and the fly at­tracted a loyal following.  Doug Prince’s name spread with the fly, although he played no part in its self-congratulatory name.  Doing so was not in his humble charac­ter:  “I tied what worked for me, and that’s all I ever really wor­ried about.”  Doug Prince received the FFF Buz Buszek Memorial Award in 1982 but said at the time that he had “no idea” why."

Edson Tigers


Dark Edson Tiger

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Yellow
Tag: Flat gold tinsel
Tail: Yellow hackle tips
Body: Yellow chenille
Throat: Red hackle fibers (red hackle tips on the original)
Wing: Brown hairs from a dyed yellow bucktail
Cheek: Edson brass eye
Head: Painted yellow then overcoated with uv resin



Light Edson Tiger

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Yellow
Tag: Flat gold tinsel
Tail: Mandarin (I used woodduck flank)
Body: Peacock herl
Wing: Yellow bucktail
Cheek: edson brass eye
Head: Painted yellow then overcoated with uv resin

Reference: Forgotten Flies

Friday, July 14, 2017

Sanctuary


Sanctuary

Tip: Gold tinsel
Tail: None
Ribbing: Gold tinsel
Body: Dark hare’s ear fur
Hackle: Brown
Wing: None

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Troutgetter


Troutgetter

Hook: Curved nymph
Thread: Red
Backstrap: Peacock herl
Ribbing: Peacock herl
Body: Yellow chenille
Hackle: Brown hen

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Murray


Murray

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Black
Tail: Red hackle fibers
Ribbing: Medium flat silver, followed by orange silk; counter wrapped with fine silver wire
Body: Black floss
Throat: Orange hackle fibers
Wing: Siberian squirrel tail

Tying note: I substituted red fox squirrel for the siberian squirrel wing

Monday, July 10, 2017

McGinty Bucktail


McGinty Bucktail

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Black
Tail: Red duck or goose quill
Body: Black & yellow chenille
Wing: Brown bear
Throat: brown hackle fibers or brown hackle wound as a collar

Reference: Forgotten Flies

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Macgregor Bucktail


Macgregor Bucktail

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Black
Tag: Flat silver tinsel
Tail: Golden pheasant crest
Ribbing: Flat silver tinsel
Body: Orange chenille
Throat: Grizzly hackle fibers
Wing: Gray squirrel tail
Cheeks: Jungle cock

Friday, July 7, 2017

Grey Mare


Grey Mare

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Black
Tail: Scarlet duck or goose quill
Ribbing: Oval silver tinsel
Throat: Brown hackle fibers
Wing: 2 Grizzly hackles back to back

Reference: John Veniard's Further Guide to Fly Dressing

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Grizzly Kings


Grizzly King Hairwing

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Black
Tail: Red hackle fibers
Ribbing: Flat silver tinsel
Body: Green floss
Throat: Teal feather fibers
Wing: Squirrel tail
Eyes: Painted Black over white


Grizzly King #2

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Black
Tail: Red hackle fibers
Ribbing: Flat silver tinsel
Body: Green floss
Throat: Teal feather fibers
Wing: Grizzly hackle


Grizzly King #2 Variation

Hook: Streamer
Thread: Black
Tail: Red hackle fibers
Ribbing: Flat silver tinsel
Body: Green floss
Throat: Teal feather fibers
Wing: Squirrel tail
Hackle: Grizzly

Reference: Forgotten Flies